May 12, 1864 letter to Nancy Brown from Hannah Towne

May 12, 1924

To: Nancy Brown, Chicago, IL

From: Hannah Towne, Kalamazoo, MI

Recalls the recent visit Nancy and others made to Michigan and how lonesome she is now. Writes a great deal about a visit that Addie Fullerton made to Harry and went into great detail about all the changes that had been made and that he was “a d—n f—l to let Ellas Mabels and Nellies pictures go out of the parlor.”

Monday 8:25 P.M. May 12 [1924]

Dear Sister and all-

Pretty late to write a letter but could’nt get to it before. A week ago to night you and Jean[1] were here – also Geo[2] and Bess[3] – Frank & Till[4] called to night suppose you are in Chicago. We wished you could of been here yesterday. It was most awful lonesome Tuesday. Ethen[5] hardly in the house only to eat. It seems most every day I can hear Jean. I did a lot of work last week so that helped out. I got the ironing all done – had a lot of clothes that you did not know of. Finished Mrs Rices up, got mending done – I jumped right in. Have washed to day to help out on next week. We did not go to Georges. It rained hard Wed- & Thursday. I expect it seemed good to get home and see the girls – and Jean to see them all and tell Helen[6] all about Michigan. I know the chickens and Daisy miss her, and I know Ethen and I do. The crate came as you know for it must be in Chicgo now. Ethen plows the garden to morrow with Frank & Fred.[7] Guess he will have to plow the corn ground. I dont see how he ever stand it and then all the rest of the work. He thinks the cod Liver oil is working his stomach a little stronger, for several nights he has’nt had to eat in the night. He wont ask Will[8] to help fix the pumps. Will knows they have got to be fixed for he has talked about it. I asked him if he did’nt think Robert Schram could help him. Of course he has got to be paid. It is enough to make any one turn in side out. Yesterday about nine oclock Mrs Roof called and asked us over to dinner said Barney would come after us. We went had a very nice time and good dinner. She said they would take us for a ride some Sunday. We hate to get in like that for one cant do any thing for them. Ida and Carrie[9] are getting along. If it dont rain to morrow the doctor wants Carrie to sit out on the porch a while and let the sun shine on her. Geo Knowels[10] passed a way yesterday funeral to morrow. Oll Milham[11] passed away Friday – buried to day. He lived at Benton Harber. Grant & Mary went. He was 82 years old. Dean got out of the barn yesterday, went as far as John Strubels, and turned in there. They caught him. Will didn’t have to go very far after him. Addie Fullerton called me one day last week wanted to know if I had called on Harry. I said no. She said he called up Sunday eve and wanted them to come over, so they and the Andersons went as you know. She said the house dont look like the same one, only two small pictures on the wall in parlor. A very handsome piano, two very nice chairs up holstered in gray plush and davenport the same. I understood her to say the chairs were Elephant style, and the rocker that was Mabels. A very pretty small stand with handsome lamp on – that is all in that room. In the den is the stand that was in the parlor – a very handsome lamp on that – the book case and one large chair. Mabels picture is in there. In sitting room the other davenport, victrola and one or two chairs. In his bed room is Ellas & Nellies pictures on the wall and Nellies dresser – and a small table or stand. Bed stands same as it has. The dining room same as it has been only the table has only a center piece on it. The kitchen the same only a small round table with oil cloth doillies on. They eat on that. Every thing shone – even the lady. She had an elegent gown on – white satin – hair white done up with french knot or roll – a great talker, good conversationalists, “can you pronounce it,” told all about their trip then she played the victrola. Harry says you see some one Else does the playing now. He was very quiet did’nt do much talking. He and Addie were in the den a lone a few minites, he said he thought everything would be all right. I thought it sounded as if they might fight some time. The lady said her mother died seven weeks before her husband did. She had lost her mind – would’nt it be a joke if the two Streators should loose theirs. I’ll bet she is _____ and he is a d—n f—l to let Ellas Mabels and Nellies pictures go out of the parlor. Addie says she is good looking and she is’nt ____ tell just about it, is about my size. She said they might have some more new furniture before I go there. She thinks he will bring her over to see me. Their names was’nt mentioned yesterday at Mr Roofs, I was glad of it I dont believes they have called on them. I must go to bed and finish this in the morning.

Tuesday 7:55 A.M.

Not very shiny this morning. Hope it wont rain so E– cant plow the garden. This is a terrible letter writing and all but my arm and hand was so stiff and lame last night and it is worse this morning. Hope we will hear from you to day or to morrow. Do you think Lou[12] will get down here before Mildred[13] goes on the trip. I must get busy.

Good bye – Love to all

H–

——-

[1] Nancy’s granddaughter, Eda “Jean” Mueller

[2] George Neumaier

[3] Nancy’s daughter, Bess (Brown) Recoschewitz

[4] Frank & Matilda (Neumaier) Doyen

[5] Their brother, Ethan Keith

[6] Nancy’s granddaughter, Helen Mueller

[7] Fred Cripe, the husband of their niece, Mildred (Harris) Cripe

[8] Their nephew, Will Clark, the son of their half-sister, Lois (Keith) Clark Skinner

[9] Her neighbor, Ida (Barber) Howe, and her daughter, Carrie. Ida married Eugene Howe in 1882; however, the 1900 census shows Ida as a widow and she and their children were living with her father. All subsequent census records list her and her children with the surname of Barber

[10] George M. Knowles of Battle Creek, Michigan

[11] Oliver Milham of Lake Township, Michigan

[12] Their sister, Louese (Keith) Harris

[13] Their niece, Mildred (Harris) Cripe

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